Home Tour: Atlanta Homes and Lifestyles Southeastern Designer Showhouse 2017

Wow, what an amazing spring weekend here in Atlanta!  The weather was perfect for a trip down to Buckhead for a home tour at the 2017 Southeastern Designer Showhouse and Gardens.

The home was built in 1962 by architect James Means for Mr. and Mrs. Rawson Haverty (yes, the same family that owns Haverty’s furniture store!)  The brick used in the facade was salvaged from the original Federal Reserve building in downtown Atlanta, and the cobblestone drive also was salvaged from downtown Atlanta’s old cobblestone streets.

The current owners commissioned architect Yong Pak to add two wings to the original structure, adding a master suite on one side, and a 3 story wing with new kitchen, family room, screen porch, garage and garage apartment on the other side.  This brings the home’s total size to over 12,000 square feet.  Not too shabby for a historic mansion in tony Tuxedo Park!

Please excuse the phone pictures, I didn’t have my trusty Nikon with me.  Lesson learned, next time bring the wide-angle lens!  Now onto the home tour.

 

Entry

Gorgeous formal living room

 

“Hers” master closet

 

Lovely marble master bath

 

Beautiful and serene master suite

 

The master sitting area overlooks the backyard

 

Oh my, this pool is so inviting.  From here you can see the soccer fields at Westminster School in the distance.

 

The back porch

 

 

Wet bar

 

Formal dining room with hand-painted wallpaper

 

The view from the third floor guest suite down into the entry below

 

One of the stunning secondary bedrooms, each with it’s own private bath

 

A little art room tucked away on the second floor

 

I love this sunny breakfast room

 

The fabulous chef’s kitchen features Wolf appliances

 

The brand new vaulted family room

 

Stunning screened porch

 

The garage apartment

 

And last but not least, the masculine wood-paneled “man-cave”

 

The drive

The showhouse runs until Sunday, May 14, 2017.  Tickets are $30, proceeds benefit the Atlanta History Center.

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